uterine

Could your fertility be a gauge of your health?

Infertility may mean health risks in the future

Research suggests that women with infertility may be at higher risk for health problems in the future

As a fertility specialist, I hear this all the time. I am healthy and take good care of myself, so there should be no reason I am not be getting pregnant. Naturally, we go on to discuss how one's fertility can be quite separate from your general health, as is quite often the case. Perhaps, though, that is not completely true.

A study out of the University of Pennsylvania and the National Cancer Institute followed women long term for health issues. 

They were mostly followed for cancer related issues, but were also asked about a history of infertility as a part of the study.

What they found though was interesting, including:

  • overall, women with a history of infertility had a 10% risk of dying over the 13 year study time
  • women with a history of infertility had a 20% increased risk of dying from cancer
  • women with a history of infertility had a 44% increased risk of dying from breast cancer
  • women with a history of infertility had a 70% increased risk of dying from diabetes, even though they were no more likely to have diabetes
  • uterine and ovarian cancer were no more common in women with a history of infertility

Does these mean the infertility causes poor health? Probably not, but it does mean that infertility could be sign of underlying health issues.

It means that women with a history of infertility, whether they were treated or not, whether they were successful or not, need to pay attention to their general health. 

 

 

Live birth after uterine transplant

Live birth after uterine transplant: Princeton IVF blog

Doctors at Baylor University deliver the first US baby born following uterine transplantation

A few years back, doctors in Sweden performed the first successful uterine transplant. Several academic fertility centers in the US have tried to replicate this here, and doctors at Baylor announced they were the first to do so.

Why would one want to transplant a uterus?

It is impossible to carry a baby without a uterus, also known as the womb. The early embryo implants itself into the wall the uterus about a week after conception and through the placenta and umbilical cord, its interface to the uterus, the fetus gets all of the nutrients and oxygen it needs to grow and even to survive.

Some women are born without a uterus (such as in the Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome), some have scar tissue in the uterus and others have had their uterus removed (a hysterectomy) for fibroids, cancer or some other reason. While there have been many many cases of ectopic pregnancies, where a pregnancy implants outside the uterus, these pregnancies nearly always need to be terminated early on since they can result on the death of the mother, and almost never results in a live birth of a baby. There is also interest in using a transplanted uterus in transgender women.

Are there alternatives ways to have baby without a uterus?

Currently, there is a very effective way of having a baby without a womb, and it is called Gestational Carrier IVF.  The eggs are harvested from the intended mother, sperm is collected from the intended father, and fertilization is performed in the IVF laboratory. The embryos are grown and transfered into the uterus another woman, referred to as a gestational carrier after her uterus is prepared for pregnancy using hormonal treatments. This can be costly (but much less so than a uterine transplatation), is illegal in some states and most importantly, the pregnancy is carried and delivered by someone else other than the intended mother.

How is a uterine transplant performed?

The uteri used for transplantation can be obtained from living donors or women who have recently passed away and offered their organs up for donation. Using an open incision (laparotomy in medical jingo), the donor uterus is attached the various blood vessels to ensure it has good supply and to attached to nearby structures to hold it in place. It is not attached to the fallopian tube.

How does a woman get pregnant after uterine transplantation?

IVF (in vitro fertilization) is required to achieve pregnancy since without a connection between the tube and uterus, pregnancy would otherwise be impossible. In years past, fertility surgeons, connected fallopian tubes to the uterus, but that operation has been abandoned since it rarely worked. IVF bypasses that problem and offers the best chance for pregnancy.

Are more uterine transplant babies coming?

The doctors at Baylor have another woman pregnant after uterine transplantation and IVF, a few more attempts planned. A number of women undergoing the procedure have not been successful. Other centers are trying this as well, but the costs are so high and it is not covered by insurance, so it not clear how widespread this will become.