toxins

Is the traffic outside affecting your chances of having a baby?

Living near a highway and IVF pregnancy rates: Princeton IVF blog
Women who live in high traffic areas are more likely to miscarry

Living in a high traffic area may hurt your chances for success with IVF

Research from Harvard presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine suggests that women with a higher exposure to automotive traffic have lower IVF success rates than other women.

The researchers looked at 660 IVF cycles done over a 14 year period and compared their success rates to  how far they lived from a class A roadway. A class A roadway means an interstate, state or US highway. 

Women who lived more than a kilometer (0.6 miles) from a major roadway were 70% more likely to have a baby than those who lived within 200 meters (about 2 football fields) of a major roadway.

Interestingly, both groups of patients had similar pregnancy rates, but the those who live closed to the highway were more likely to miscarry.

Does this mean moving to a low traffic area will improve your chances  of having a baby?

Not necessarily. It does show what we already know, that the environment we live in and the air we breathe plays a role in reproduction, as it does in other aspects of health.

 

Plastic bottles, BPA and infertility

nalgene-bpa free bottle

Bisphenol-A (BPA), a chemical found in some plastic bottles has been shown to affect egg development. Researchers at Brigham and Womens Hospital/Harvard Medical School showed that the left over eggs from IVF were less likely to develop properly if there were exposed to high levels of BPA. Click here from the story from the Boston Globe. Click here for the original article from the journal Human Reproduction. It is not clear whether the low levels seen in most plastic bottles is enough to cause any problems though.