pregnancy rates

Acupuncture and Infertility

Acupuncture and IVF pregnancy rates: Princeton IVF blog
New study sheds doubt on whether acupuncture really helps IVF pregnancy rates

Lots of women seek out acupuncture to help them get pregnant, but does it really help?

Complementary and alternative medical treatments have become very popular for treating and preventing diseases, including the treatment of infertility. This may including vitamins and herbs and treatments such as acupuncture.

A number of researchers have found that acupuncture does improve fertility, at least in women who are undergoing IVF treatment, but some have not.

In order to figure out what it really going on, a group of doctors in Australia studies 824 women undergoing in vitro fertilization at their clinic. Half got real acupuncture (meaning the needles were placed in the right place according to acupuncture practice guidelines) and in the other half of patients, the needles were placed in locations that were not expected to have any effect. We call this last treatment "sham" acupuncture. They compared outcomes between the two groups.

They found out that women who had sham acupuncture were no more likely to get pregnant than those who had acupuncture done correctly. The pregnancy rates in these two groups were almost identical.

So what does this mean?

It is likely that acupuncture does not improve the chances for success with IVF, and if it does, the benefit is likely very small.

Were there any benefits to acupuncture in these women?

Yes. Women who received acupuncture were more relaxed and had a better sense of well being that those who had only sham acupuncture. This is not a small issue since IVF treatment is very stressful to the couples who are going through it.

Knowing this, should I still get acupuncture done?

Acupuncture is safe and comforting even if it may not be effective in IVF treatment. Other than the cost if it is not covered, there is really no risk to trying it.

When is it time to give up on IVF?

Couples continue to get pregnant with IVF put 8 cycles.
When is it time to stop IVF: Princeton IVF blog

Any couple who has gone through IVF knows what a rough and wild ride it can be, both physically and emotionally. For that reason, many couples give up on IVF early on, perhaps too early.

Why do women drop out of IVF treatment?

The reasons why women quite IVF are usually financial, when their insurance coverage or access to funds to pay for treatment run out, or emotional, when the thought of going through another cycle and the prospect of all the drugs, office visits and prospect of disappointment becomes overwhelming.

But, what happens to couples who persist and continue to go through IVF treatment cycles?

Fertility doctors in Bristol in the UK, sought to answer that question and what they found was encouraging. In their program, 1/3 of patients conceived on the first IVF cycle. In the next 3 cycles (1-4) the pregnancy rate was about 20% per cycle. While the rates were lower in cycles 5 and 6, they were not zero. Pregnancies continue to happen.

After 6 cycles of IVF, the cumulative pregnancy rate was 68%. In women between 40 and 42, there were successful pregnancies through the 9th cycle.

We've failed a few cycles of IVF. Should we give up?

Only you and your partner can answer that question. IVF tends to be more successful on the first round, but successful pregnancies do continue to happen with repeated attempts, sometimes even when it seems futile.

 

How old is too old to try IVF ?

With stories of 45 year celebrities having babies (and sometimes even twins and triplets) with high tech treatments, most people think that age is not a barrier to successful treatment.  When using donor eggs from a young egg donor, that is definitely true. The chances for success with donor egg ivf is excellent, even for women in their late 40's. However that is not the case in women using their own eggs. Pregnancies in women undergoing fertility treatment without the use of a donor over 45 are very unusual.  A recent report from Florida describes a 46 year old woman who is reported to be oldest woman to conceive from IVF with her own eggs. Is this a major breakthrough? Not really. The main determinant over whether a fertilized egg will develop into a healthy baby is whether the embryo is genetically abnormal. Genetically normal embryos are common in 25 year olds but pregnancy rates are never 100%. Likewise, the vast majority of  45 year olds' embryos are abnormal, and so the pregnancy rates would be expected to be quite low but not exactly 0%. When confronted with these odds, most couples would chose not to try.

Weight does impact the chances for IVF success

We have know for years that being overweight can affect fertility and lower success rates for infertility treatments such as IVF. Some centers have even set weight limits on IVF treatment for this reason. However, it wasn't clear if being overweight was harming the eggs or making the uterus less receptive to pregnancy. A recent study from Spain found that overweight patients had lower pregnancy rates even when they got eggs from a normal weight woman, meaning that this effect is due at least in part to a problem with the uterus. The take home lesson: weight loss may improve your chances of having a baby even with donor eggs. For more information from Dr. Sanjay Gupta's Guide, click here