motility

Sperm selfies?

Testing for male fertility on your smartphone: Princeton IVF blog

Could your smartphone replace a semen analysis?

At home, iphone and android based sperm test kit

 

Can this device replace a semen analysis with your doctor? Maybe in the future.

Based on research from Harvard University, engineers have developed a new device for an at home "semen analysis." There are already at home sperm test kits available in stores, what is so unique about this one? Simply put, it is the smart phone. This device attaches to and taps the power of your iphone or android device through it's app, to analyze the data and give you a visual display of what the laboratory folks would see under the microscope.

The pros:

  • low cost
  • quick results
  • can be done at home without the awkwardness
  • you get to see what the actual sperm look like

The cons:

  • lacks the details your doctor may need (actual sperm concentration and motility)
  • unable to accurately determine morphology (another important part of the semen analysis)

The idea is a good one.

Reliable, inexpensive testing in a comfortable setting, and a way to determine when it's time to visit the fertility doctor or urologist. The reality is not quite there yet. The information is not quite enough to replace the formal semen analysis at a clinic, but with improvements in the software, it may well be in the future.

Sperm counts are dropping

Sperm counts are declining across the west: Princeton IVF blog

A recent publication suggests that sperm counts may be declining all across the western world

Research suggest sperm quality is going down across the western world.

It is been all over the news lately.  Some in the media have even suggested this may bring our doom as a species. So, what's the real story behind this...


A recent paper published suggests that sperm counts may be declining in Western countries.  


While this is not entirely new, it is a continuation of a trend that has been noted for years.  This there has been a decline in sperm quality noted in the United States and other western nations. The authors compiled studies done over a number of years including:

  • 185 studies
  • over 42,000 men
  • between 1973 and 2011
  • from US, Europe, Australia and New Zealand

Over the 39 years, the sperm concentration dropped 52.4% and the total sperm count went down 59.3%, a hugh decline.

While this is concerning, it raises even more questions:

  • Have the counts really declined or is it just the techniques used to count the sperm?
  • If the counts are going down, is it actually affecting male fertility?
  • Is this a problem in the developing world or just in the west?
  • If this being caused by increasing obesity?
  • Is this being caused by something in the environment?

 

Only time and further research will answer these questions.