iphone

Sperm selfies?

Testing for male fertility on your smartphone: Princeton IVF blog

Could your smartphone replace a semen analysis?

At home, iphone and android based sperm test kit

 

Can this device replace a semen analysis with your doctor? Maybe in the future.

Based on research from Harvard University, engineers have developed a new device for an at home "semen analysis." There are already at home sperm test kits available in stores, what is so unique about this one? Simply put, it is the smart phone. This device attaches to and taps the power of your iphone or android device through it's app, to analyze the data and give you a visual display of what the laboratory folks would see under the microscope.

The pros:

  • low cost
  • quick results
  • can be done at home without the awkwardness
  • you get to see what the actual sperm look like

The cons:

  • lacks the details your doctor may need (actual sperm concentration and motility)
  • unable to accurately determine morphology (another important part of the semen analysis)

The idea is a good one.

Reliable, inexpensive testing in a comfortable setting, and a way to determine when it's time to visit the fertility doctor or urologist. The reality is not quite there yet. The information is not quite enough to replace the formal semen analysis at a clinic, but with improvements in the software, it may well be in the future.

So how accurate is my fertility app?

Fertility apps for the iphone and android: Princeton IVF blog
Do fertility apps work?

Many couples trying to get pregnant use them, but do fertility apps for the iphone and android devices really give you valuable information?

As a fertility specialist, my patients are always sharing with me information they learn about their menstrual cycles and their fertile windows from apps on their cell phones. Knowledge about one's body is always a good thing to have, but are these apps really helping couples get accurate information?

To answer this questions, doctors at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York looked at whether these apps (and websites which give out similar information) actually properly inform normal fertile women with regular cycles on the correct days to try for a baby. What they found was a bit disappointing.

While fertility apps were able to select the most fertile day of the cycle, they were quite frequently inaccurate on advising women about their "fertile window."

The apps were not a total bust. Couples who followed the apps advice were not putting their chances of having a baby in peril, even if the app's advice was less than optimal. The iphone has still not replaced the advice of your fertility doctor or gynecologist, at least not yet.