gestational carrier

Live birth after uterine transplant

Live birth after uterine transplant: Princeton IVF blog

Doctors at Baylor University deliver the first US baby born following uterine transplantation

A few years back, doctors in Sweden performed the first successful uterine transplant. Several academic fertility centers in the US have tried to replicate this here, and doctors at Baylor announced they were the first to do so.

Why would one want to transplant a uterus?

It is impossible to carry a baby without a uterus, also known as the womb. The early embryo implants itself into the wall the uterus about a week after conception and through the placenta and umbilical cord, its interface to the uterus, the fetus gets all of the nutrients and oxygen it needs to grow and even to survive.

Some women are born without a uterus (such as in the Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome), some have scar tissue in the uterus and others have had their uterus removed (a hysterectomy) for fibroids, cancer or some other reason. While there have been many many cases of ectopic pregnancies, where a pregnancy implants outside the uterus, these pregnancies nearly always need to be terminated early on since they can result on the death of the mother, and almost never results in a live birth of a baby. There is also interest in using a transplanted uterus in transgender women.

Are there alternatives ways to have baby without a uterus?

Currently, there is a very effective way of having a baby without a womb, and it is called Gestational Carrier IVF.  The eggs are harvested from the intended mother, sperm is collected from the intended father, and fertilization is performed in the IVF laboratory. The embryos are grown and transfered into the uterus another woman, referred to as a gestational carrier after her uterus is prepared for pregnancy using hormonal treatments. This can be costly (but much less so than a uterine transplatation), is illegal in some states and most importantly, the pregnancy is carried and delivered by someone else other than the intended mother.

How is a uterine transplant performed?

The uteri used for transplantation can be obtained from living donors or women who have recently passed away and offered their organs up for donation. Using an open incision (laparotomy in medical jingo), the donor uterus is attached the various blood vessels to ensure it has good supply and to attached to nearby structures to hold it in place. It is not attached to the fallopian tube.

How does a woman get pregnant after uterine transplantation?

IVF (in vitro fertilization) is required to achieve pregnancy since without a connection between the tube and uterus, pregnancy would otherwise be impossible. In years past, fertility surgeons, connected fallopian tubes to the uterus, but that operation has been abandoned since it rarely worked. IVF bypasses that problem and offers the best chance for pregnancy.

Are more uterine transplant babies coming?

The doctors at Baylor have another woman pregnant after uterine transplantation and IVF, a few more attempts planned. A number of women undergoing the procedure have not been successful. Other centers are trying this as well, but the costs are so high and it is not covered by insurance, so it not clear how widespread this will become.

Twin sons from another mother: a true story

A gestational carrier with twins finds out one of the twins she was carrying was her own

Surrogate mom gives birth  to twins boys, but one only was from her IVF cycle, the others was her own.

How is that possible?

When a couple uses a gestational carrier (what most people think of a surrogacy), embryos are produced from the eggs from the intended mother and sperm from the intended father. Sometimes the eggs or sperm are from a donor instead. Regardless, the embryos are placed in the womb of the gestational carrier, the woman who will carry the pregnancy and give birth for the intended parents. The carrier will take hormones to help prepare her uterus for pregnancy. This process has been done for years by fertility specialists, is highly successful and despite its complexity usually goes off without a hitch.

Not this time though...

A California woman agreed to be a gestational carrier for another couple. They did a form of IVF and the procedure seemingly went well. The carrier became pregnant and on ultrasound they saw twins.  Since one embryo was transfered, the doctors naturally assumed the twins were identical. The pregnancy went well, the twins were delivered by cesarian section and went to live with the intended parents.

A month later, genetic testing revealed that the twins were not identical, and that the child's genetic parents were actually the gestational carrier and her husband.

How could this happen...

In a process called suprafecundation, a women who is already pregnant, or this case, in the process of becoming pregnant, can ovulate again.

When this happens, a woman who is pregnant would conceive a second pregnancy when she ovulates a month later. So, the second baby would be due a month later than the first. This type of event is exceedingly rare, but it looks like this is happened here, but on a shorter time frame.