delay

Your diet and menopause

Diet, vitamins and menopause: Princeton IVF blog
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Can what you eat affect when you go into menopause?

New research from the UK suggests that it might.

They followed 914 women through menopause and sent them questionnaires about their diets, and what they found was interesting:

  • Fatty and oily fish delayed the age of menopause by 3.3 years for each daily portion

  • Fresh legumes delayed onset of menopause by 0.9 years for each daily portion

  • Refined pastas and rice was accelerated the age of menopause 1.5 years for each daily portion

They also asked these women about daily vitamin intake:

  • Vitamin B6 delayed menopause by 0.6 years

  • Zinc delayed menopause by 0.3 years per daily portion

Does this mean that making the right dietary choices can affect when one will go through menopause?

Perhaps, but not necessarily. Women who eat healthier may also live healthier lifestyles which could contribute to this as well.

Does this mean that these dietary choices can effect how long a woman will remain fertile?

While it certainly makes sense that dietary changes which delay when a woman runs out eggs should affect the quality of the ones that are left, this research does not address that issue.

Delaying the diagnosis of PCOS

PCOS may take years to diagnose: Princeton IVF blog
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How long to does it take to be diagnosed polycystic ovarian syndrome?

Apparently a lot longer than you might expect...

A recent study from University of Pennsylvania suggests that women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome may not receive the proper diagnosis for years.

Women across the US and Europe were surveyed and this is what the researchers found:

  • in 1/3 of women, it took at least 2 years to make the diagnosis
  • almost of half of women had visited at least 3 health care providers before the diagnosis was made
  • 84 % of women did not believe they received enough information about PCOS at the time of their diagnosis

As a Reproductive Endocrinologist, this is both surprising and not expected.

In our practice, as in most fertility and gynecology practices, PCOS is one of the most common disorders that we see. It is the most common hormonal disorder in women of reproductive age and the ovulation problems associated with PCOS are the most common cause for infertility in women. So, as specialists, we are attuned to look for polycystic ovary, and are more likely to find it in its more subtle forms. We are also committed to educate our patients about their condition, what causes it, how it is treated and what other health implications it might have.

It is also very common for us to see women who were never told by their doctor that they might have PCOS, and only came to see us because they cannot conceive. Still others, looked up their symptoms online, realized they had PCOS and referred themselves.

Sometimes seeing a specialist can help.

Most of the time your OBGYN, midwife or even primary care physician can manage the symptoms of PCOS. If your symptoms are under control and have a good understanding of your condition, there is no reason to seek out help. If your symptoms not controlled, you are having trouble getting pregnant or you don't feel you have an adequate understanding of PCOS, seeing a sub specialist in Reproductive Medicine may be a good idea. 

 

 

Egg freezing- the controversy continues

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Egg freezing- Is it effective and is it a "fertility insurance?"

Several years back the American Society for Reproductive Medicine declared that the freezing and storage of unfertilized eggs (oocyte cryopreservation) was no longer experimental. Reproductive science specialists have worked out the kinks and figured how to freeze, thaw, fertilize and grow these eggs, and from them get healthy live born children. The initial focus was to help women who wanted to have children, but were facing cancer treatment (surgery, chemotherapy or radiation) that might render them sterile. The data on pregnancy rates was very sparse but it in comparison to the alternative in these women, moving forward was a no brainer.

Now researchers in in Canada, have published on the outcomes in couples based on US data. The pregnancy rates range from 4-12 %, and that is in young women under 30.  The rates are likely much lower in women in their 30s and 40s. While not great, it does offer some hope where there was none before. The problems is that now egg freezing is being used to delay childbearing in women for social reasons. With the announcement by google that they will pay for the procedure in their employees and the advent of "egg freezing parties," this is becoming more widespread.

As reproductive medicine specialists, we all want to offer our patients reproductive freedom, the ability to have children at a time that works out in their lives. Undoubtably, freezing and storing eggs for future use will enable some women to have children well into their 40's and early 50's. However, those who are unsuccessful with frozen eggs, and there will be many of them, will be left little choice other than using eggs from a donor, knowing that their biologic clock ran out while they had other priorities in life.

The problem is this: Is egg freezing an answer to a real problem? or is it giving women false hope? It may be a little of both. Only time will tell as the technology moves forward.