death

Fewer complications in IVF pregnancies?

New research suggests IVF pregnancies could have lower rates of some complications

Surprisingly, some complications might actually be less common in pregnancies that result from assisted reproductive technology such as IVF

This seems to go against what fertility doctors, obgyns and midwives have been telling their patients for years, namely that women with IVF pregnancies are more likely than "regular" pregnancies to experience pregnancy complications.

What complications were actually less common in IVF pregnancies?

A group looking at IVF outcome data submitted through the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) found that risk of perinatal mortality (the risk of stillbirth or newborn death) in very premature births was lower in women who conceived with IVF than those who did not. They found this to be true with both single births and multiple births (twins triplets, etc.) This informations was recently presented at the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Does this mean getting pregnant with IVF is actually safer than getting pregnant on your own?

Probably not. Women who conceived with IVF were less likely to lose a premature baby than those who got pregnant on their own. We have no idea why this is the case. It could be due to more careful prenatal care with IVF pregnancies, or a higher socioeconomic level in couples doing IVF, rather that a results of what is actually going on with the pregnancy. 

Why is this surprising?

There are many studies show a higher rate of complications in pregnancies that result from assisted reproduction such as IVF, and some others that show no effect. It was surprising to find out from such as large database, that at least one serious complication was less common.

Could your fertility be a gauge of your health?

Infertility may mean health risks in the future

Research suggests that women with infertility may be at higher risk for health problems in the future

As a fertility specialist, I hear this all the time. I am healthy and take good care of myself, so there should be no reason I am not be getting pregnant. Naturally, we go on to discuss how one's fertility can be quite separate from your general health, as is quite often the case. Perhaps, though, that is not completely true.

A study out of the University of Pennsylvania and the National Cancer Institute followed women long term for health issues. 

They were mostly followed for cancer related issues, but were also asked about a history of infertility as a part of the study.

What they found though was interesting, including:

  • overall, women with a history of infertility had a 10% risk of dying over the 13 year study time
  • women with a history of infertility had a 20% increased risk of dying from cancer
  • women with a history of infertility had a 44% increased risk of dying from breast cancer
  • women with a history of infertility had a 70% increased risk of dying from diabetes, even though they were no more likely to have diabetes
  • uterine and ovarian cancer were no more common in women with a history of infertility

Does these mean the infertility causes poor health? Probably not, but it does mean that infertility could be sign of underlying health issues.

It means that women with a history of infertility, whether they were treated or not, whether they were successful or not, need to pay attention to their general health.