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AMH blood test- everything you wanted to know about this common blood test but were afraid to ask

AMH testing, a Q&A: Princeton IVF blog
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Common questions and answers about AMH testing

What is AMH?

Antimullerian hormone, commonly known at AMH, is hormone that is secreted by follicles in the ovary. It was initially studied for its role in reproductive development but is now widely used as a test of ovarian reserve.

What is ovarian reserve?

Ovarian reserve is a measure of the aging of the ovaries, and how many eggs the ovaries are likely to produce when given fertility medications. AMH, day 3 FSH and estradiol levels and antral follicle counts on ultrasound are commonly used measures of ovarian reserve.

What does a low AMH level mean?

A low AMH level, which most doctors consider a level of less than one, indicates that the ovary has fewer eggs available to stimulate. Women with low AMH levels, will usually make fewer eggs when given fertility drugs for IVF or insemination cycles.

Does a low AMH level mean that I am less likely to get pregnant?

AMH is a great test to determine how a woman will respond to medications, but it not as good at predicting pregnancy rates. It is true that women who produce more eggs are more likely to get pregnant, but particularly in young women, who do not need a large number of eggs, there does not seem to be reason to be concerned.

What does a high AMH level mean?

A high AMH level suggests that you are likely to respond very well to fertility injections and may be more likely to become hyperstimulated when taking them. It is also is considered a sign of polycystic ovaries (PCO) although AMH levels are not currently used to make the diagnosis.

Can the AMH level be used to predict if I will have trouble getting pregnant in the future?

Not really. Despite the early hope that AMH could help women know in advance if they might have infertility in the future, it turns out there is no evidence that AMH can predict future fertility.