US

Eight million IVF babies

World welcomes the 8 millionth IVF baby: Princeton IVF blog

2018 sees the number of IVF babies top 8 million

IVF is a now a common treatment for infertility

It’s been 40 years since Louise Brown, the first IVF baby, was born in the United Kingdom. At the time, it was both a miracle and controversial. Now in 2018, it has become a common medical procedure, not just in Britain and the US, but around the world. Now we have reached a new milestone.

2018 marks the birth of the 8 millionth IVF baby

So what is IVF all about?

IVF means in vitro fertilization. In vitro literally means in glass. The eggs and sperm are removed from the body, fertilized in a dish (it’s plastic, not glass though) and returned to the womb.

Why has IVF become so common?

Because it works. While IVF is not always successful, it is the only fertility treatment that has higher pregnancy rates than those of normal fertile couples. The technology has improved, and as the developing world has become more prosperous, these technologies have spread outside the US and Western Europe. IVF is now largely accessible to infertile couples worldwide.

Why do IVF instead of other medical procedures?

IVF is not necessarily the first treatment we try. Many patients will conceive with other lower tech ways such as intrauterine insemination or fertility pills and don’t need IVF. Some couples, such as those with damaged fallopian tubes or with very poor quality sperm, cannot conceive without IVF.

Sperm counts are dropping

Sperm counts are declining across the west: Princeton IVF blog

A recent publication suggests that sperm counts may be declining all across the western world

Research suggest sperm quality is going down across the western world.

It is been all over the news lately.  Some in the media have even suggested this may bring our doom as a species. So, what's the real story behind this...


A recent paper published suggests that sperm counts may be declining in Western countries.  


While this is not entirely new, it is a continuation of a trend that has been noted for years.  This there has been a decline in sperm quality noted in the United States and other western nations. The authors compiled studies done over a number of years including:

  • 185 studies
  • over 42,000 men
  • between 1973 and 2011
  • from US, Europe, Australia and New Zealand

Over the 39 years, the sperm concentration dropped 52.4% and the total sperm count went down 59.3%, a hugh decline.

While this is concerning, it raises even more questions:

  • Have the counts really declined or is it just the techniques used to count the sperm?
  • If the counts are going down, is it actually affecting male fertility?
  • Is this a problem in the developing world or just in the west?
  • If this being caused by increasing obesity?
  • Is this being caused by something in the environment?

 

Only time and further research will answer these questions.