Princeton

Dr. Seth Derman, Inside Jersey Top Doctor

Dr. Seth Derman- a top fertility doctor in NJ
Seth G Derman, MD, Reproductive Medicine Specialist and Inside Jersey top doctor

Dr Derman named to the top doctor list once again for 2017

The medical director at Princeton IVF and a Reproductive Endocrinologist at Delaware Valley OBGYN and Infertility, Dr. Seth Derman has been named one of Inside Jersey Magazine's Top 2128 Doctors for 2017.

Candidates for the top doctor list are vetted  by Castle Connolly, and nominated and selected by their peers for inclusion in this list.

Dr. Derman named top doc

Seth G Derman, MD selected as a top doctor by Castle Connolly

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Princeton IVF and Delaware Valley OBGYN are pleased to congratulate Dr. Seth Derman for his selection as a regional Top Doctor in Reproductive Endocrinology by Castle Connolly.  The organization is a leader in helping patients find the best doctors in various medical specialties. They assist magazines such as Inside Jersey, New York Magazine and Philadelphia Magazine in compiling their top doctor lists.

Reproductive Endocrinology (also referred to as Reproductive Medicine) is the subspecialty of Obstetrics and Gynecology that deals mainly with infertility and recurrent miscarriages, but also other reproductive hormonal disorders such as polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), endometriosis and developmental disorders of reproductive system.

According to  Castle Connolly's website:

These Top Doctors' medical educations, training, hospital appointments, disciplinary histories - and much more - are screened by the Castle Connolly physician-led research team. Those doctors who are among the very best in their specialties and in their communities are selected for inclusion. Doctors do not and cannot pay to be included in any Castle Connolly Guide or online directory.

UK Authorities gives three parent IVF the green light

Several months back, we reported in our blog that the authorities that regulate IVF and other fertility procedures in the UK were considering allowing IVF with mitochondrial transfer to move forward. Mitochondrial transfer is more popularly known as "three parent IVF," because it involves three genetic parents: the woman who provides her chromosomes, the husband who provides his chromosomes and the donor who provides the mitochondria which contain their own DNA.  The HFEA in the UK has now given the green light for tightly regulated research to proceed on mitochondrial transfer. So, now it is likely that fertility researchers in Britain will move forward and learn whether this technique can help couples with mitochondrial diseases.

Genetically testing embryos can improve the chances for pregnancy and lower the risk of multiples

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This article which appeared recently in our local paper The Trenton Times (and originaly in the Star Ledger) profiled a laboratory we work with at Princeton IVF called Reprogenetics. The test they discussed called Array cGH involves removing some cells from embryos created during IVF and testing them to compare the amount of genetic material they contain from each of the chromosomes. It enables us to diagnose disorders such as Down Syndrome and Turner Syndrome, avoid putting back most abnormal embryos and select embryos for gender. In comparison to earlier methods it is a more comprehensive chromosome screening technique. Click here to read the article.

Plastic bottles, BPA and infertility

nalgene-bpa free bottle

Bisphenol-A (BPA), a chemical found in some plastic bottles has been shown to affect egg development. Researchers at Brigham and Womens Hospital/Harvard Medical School showed that the left over eggs from IVF were less likely to develop properly if there were exposed to high levels of BPA. Click here from the story from the Boston Globe. Click here for the original article from the journal Human Reproduction. It is not clear whether the low levels seen in most plastic bottles is enough to cause any problems though.

Do human embryos like music? Maybe

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For many years, people would talk to their plants to try to make them to grow better. In a new twist on this same idea, IVF researchers in Spain fertilized eggs (using ICSI) and cultured half of the eggs with music and half without.  It turns out that the eggs exposed to music were more likely to fertilize.  Click here for more.

Welcome to our blog from Seth G Derman, MD

I welcome you to the Princeton Fertility Blog. I am a specialist in Reproductive Medicine and the Medical Director at Princeton IVF in Lawrenceville, NJ. I have been caring for couples with infertility and recurrent miscarriages, polycystic ovarian syndrome, endometriosis and other reproductive hormonal disorders for the past two decades.