POF

Your diet and menopause

Diet, vitamins and menopause: Princeton IVF blog
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Can what you eat affect when you go into menopause?

New research from the UK suggests that it might.

They followed 914 women through menopause and sent them questionnaires about their diets, and what they found was interesting:

  • Fatty and oily fish delayed the age of menopause by 3.3 years for each daily portion

  • Fresh legumes delayed onset of menopause by 0.9 years for each daily portion

  • Refined pastas and rice was accelerated the age of menopause 1.5 years for each daily portion

They also asked these women about daily vitamin intake:

  • Vitamin B6 delayed menopause by 0.6 years

  • Zinc delayed menopause by 0.3 years per daily portion

Does this mean that making the right dietary choices can affect when one will go through menopause?

Perhaps, but not necessarily. Women who eat healthier may also live healthier lifestyles which could contribute to this as well.

Does this mean that these dietary choices can effect how long a woman will remain fertile?

While it certainly makes sense that dietary changes which delay when a woman runs out eggs should affect the quality of the ones that are left, this research does not address that issue.

Can menopause be reversed with stem cells?

Restoring fertility with stem cells: Princeton IVF blog
New research suggests bone marrow stem cells could be used restore estrogen and fertility in women with early menopause.

It may become possible in the near future

Women who suffer from premature menopause, also known as primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) or primary ovarian failure (POF) have either run out of eggs or no eggs capable of being stimulated.

This can occur for a number of reasons but early menopause causes 2 major problems for women who suffer from it. One is infertility, and this type of infertility can usually only be successfully treated with donor egg IVF. The other problem is hormonal. With the depletion of ovarian follicles, levels of reproductive hormones, especially estrogen, drop dramatically. The low levels of estrogen can cause a number of problems including vaginal dryness, difficulty with intercourse, hot flushes, bone loss and loss of sleep to name a few.

So, if there was a safe way to restore eggs to an ovary that has shut down prematurely, it might be a great advance in women's health care.

With that in mind, the ROSE trial was undertaken. The researchers injected cells from the bone marrow, which is rich in stem cells into the ovaries in an attempt to help regenerate new eggs.

Obtaining cells from the bone marrow is a fairly routine medical procedure and injecting substances into the ovarian is also not a new procedure. What is new about this is combining the two and using stem cell to restore ovarian function.

The few patients in the trial had an increase in the size of their ovaries and higher estrogen levels even a year out of from the procedure.

It will still take time and more studies to determine how safe and effective stem cells from the bone marrow are at restoring functioning ovaries and fertility to women with premature menopause / POI, but the results so far are encouraging.