England

Your diet and menopause

Diet, vitamins and menopause: Princeton IVF blog
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Can what you eat affect when you go into menopause?

New research from the UK suggests that it might.

They followed 914 women through menopause and sent them questionnaires about their diets, and what they found was interesting:

  • Fatty and oily fish delayed the age of menopause by 3.3 years for each daily portion

  • Fresh legumes delayed onset of menopause by 0.9 years for each daily portion

  • Refined pastas and rice was accelerated the age of menopause 1.5 years for each daily portion

They also asked these women about daily vitamin intake:

  • Vitamin B6 delayed menopause by 0.6 years

  • Zinc delayed menopause by 0.3 years per daily portion

Does this mean that making the right dietary choices can affect when one will go through menopause?

Perhaps, but not necessarily. Women who eat healthier may also live healthier lifestyles which could contribute to this as well.

Does this mean that these dietary choices can effect how long a woman will remain fertile?

While it certainly makes sense that dietary changes which delay when a woman runs out eggs should affect the quality of the ones that are left, this research does not address that issue.

When is it time to give up on IVF?

Couples continue to get pregnant with IVF put 8 cycles.
When is it time to stop IVF: Princeton IVF blog

Any couple who has gone through IVF knows what a rough and wild ride it can be, both physically and emotionally. For that reason, many couples give up on IVF early on, perhaps too early.

Why do women drop out of IVF treatment?

The reasons why women quite IVF are usually financial, when their insurance coverage or access to funds to pay for treatment run out, or emotional, when the thought of going through another cycle and the prospect of all the drugs, office visits and prospect of disappointment becomes overwhelming.

But, what happens to couples who persist and continue to go through IVF treatment cycles?

Fertility doctors in Bristol in the UK, sought to answer that question and what they found was encouraging. In their program, 1/3 of patients conceived on the first IVF cycle. In the next 3 cycles (1-4) the pregnancy rate was about 20% per cycle. While the rates were lower in cycles 5 and 6, they were not zero. Pregnancies continue to happen.

After 6 cycles of IVF, the cumulative pregnancy rate was 68%. In women between 40 and 42, there were successful pregnancies through the 9th cycle.

We've failed a few cycles of IVF. Should we give up?

Only you and your partner can answer that question. IVF tends to be more successful on the first round, but successful pregnancies do continue to happen with repeated attempts, sometimes even when it seems futile.

 

IVF no longer covered where it all started

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The first IVF baby Louise Brown was conceived near Cambridge, England over 3 decades ago...

Now it turns out that National Health Service in Cambridgeshire will no longer cover IVF treatment in the place where it all began.

It is sad but true according the BBC...

The UK with its single payer government health system, like all other health systems, has limited funds and been forced to make a decision on where to cut. In Cambridgeshire, coverage for IVF was one of those cuts even though ivf treatment is recommended by the nhs' own guidelines.

In the United States, where we have a more fragmented system, some states such as New Jersey where we are located, mandate coverage. While the law remains intact and recently was amended to expand the definition of infertility, health care reform laws such as the Affordable Care Act (ACA, Obamacare) has actually reduced the number of women in our state who are covered for fertility treatment. When faced with multiple mandates, employers and insurers are forced to make decisions where to cut to control their premiums.

While there is plenty of talk these days about advocating a single payer government controlled system, it is not clear that such a change will benefit couples with infertility. While some countries with national health care systems do cover IVF and other treatments, it is often the first item on the chopping block when costs are getting out of control. It is certainly the case in Britain.

For those who advocate for the availability of treatment of infertile couples, be careful what you wish for. Increased access to medical care does not necessarily mean increaseD access to fertility care.