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Delaying the diagnosis of PCOS

PCOS-delayed-diagnosis.jpg

How long to does it take to be diagnosed polycystic ovarian syndrome?

Apparently a lot longer than you might expect...

A recent study from University of Pennsylvania suggests that women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome may not receive the proper diagnosis for years.

Women across the US and Europe were surveyed and this is what the researchers found:

  • in 1/3 of women, it took at least 2 years to make the diagnosis
  • almost of half of women had visited at least 3 health care providers before the diagnosis was made
  • 84 % of women did not believe they received enough information about PCOS at the time of their diagnosis

As a Reproductive Endocrinologist, this is both surprising and not expected.

In our practice, as in most fertility and gynecology practices, PCOS is one of the most common disorders that we see. It is the most common hormonal disorder in women of reproductive age and the ovulation problems associated with PCOS are the most common cause for infertility in women. So, as specialists, we are attuned to look for polycystic ovary, and are more likely to find it in its more subtle forms. We are also committed to educate our patients about their condition, what causes it, how it is treated and what other health implications it might have.

It is also very common for us to see women who were never told by their doctor that they might have PCOS, and only came to see us because they cannot conceive. Still others, looked up their symptoms online, realized they had PCOS and referred themselves.

Sometimes seeing a specialist can help.

Most of the time your OBGYN, midwife or even primary care physician can manage the symptoms of PCOS. If your symptoms are under control and have a good understanding of your condition, there is no reason to seek out help. If your symptoms not controlled, you are having trouble getting pregnant or you don't feel you have an adequate understanding of PCOS, seeing a sub specialist in Reproductive Medicine may be a good idea.