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Veterans and Fertility Care

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US Congress considers improving veterans access to reproductive health care

After faithfully serving our country in Iraq and Afghanistan, many of the brave men and women of our armed forces return home with injuries. While the more devastating injuries such as head injuries, missing limbs and PTSD, make all the headlines, there are other battle scars that remain unspoken. One of those is infertility.

Serving our nation can have an adverse effect on couple's ability to start or grow a family, whether it be from the direct trauma of battle or the inevitable delays that come from prolonged deployments. Appropriately, the Defense Department recognizes the importance of this for our fighting men and women and provides at least some fertility coverage for active service personnel.

The same is not true for our veterans. In fact, federal law prohibits covering these treatments through the VA system. On several occasions, Senator Patty Murray (D-Washington) has introduced bills to address this issue without success. Now, there is also movement on the other side of the aisle. Just this past week, Representative Jeff Miller (R-Florida), Chairman of the House Committe on Veterans Affairs has introduced a bill to correct this inequity. His bill HR 2257, if passed and signed into law, will allow veterans to treat fertility issues that arose during their service even after they leave the armed forces. Hopefully, this legislation will make it through the congress and on to the President's desk.

 

Common preception is often incorrect: Infertility rates are not rising.

A recent report from the Centers for Disease Control suggests that infertility is actually becoming less common despite the popular wisdom that it more common than ever. The why is unknown. It could be due to couples seeking treatment sooner, economic concerns in this uncertain age or reductions in sexually transmitted diseases.  For more on this story, click here.