Milestones

Eight million IVF babies

World welcomes the 8 millionth IVF baby: Princeton IVF blog

2018 sees the number of IVF babies top 8 million

IVF is a now a common treatment for infertility

It’s been 40 years since Louise Brown, the first IVF baby, was born in the United Kingdom. At the time, it was both a miracle and controversial. Now in 2018, it has become a common medical procedure, not just in Britain and the US, but around the world. Now we have reached a new milestone.

2018 marks the birth of the 8 millionth IVF baby

So what is IVF all about?

IVF means in vitro fertilization. In vitro literally means in glass. The eggs and sperm are removed from the body, fertilized in a dish (it’s plastic, not glass though) and returned to the womb.

Why has IVF become so common?

Because it works. While IVF is not always successful, it is the only fertility treatment that has higher pregnancy rates than those of normal fertile couples. The technology has improved, and as the developing world has become more prosperous, these technologies have spread outside the US and Western Europe. IVF is now largely accessible to infertile couples worldwide.

Why do IVF instead of other medical procedures?

IVF is not necessarily the first treatment we try. Many patients will conceive with other lower tech ways such as intrauterine insemination or fertility pills and don’t need IVF. Some couples, such as those with damaged fallopian tubes or with very poor quality sperm, cannot conceive without IVF.

Dr Derman a top doctor again

Seth G Derman,MD, top doctor: Princeton IVF blog

Dr. Seth Derman listed as top doctor in Reproductive Medicine again for 2018

A top fertility doctor in New Jersey 2018 from Inside Jersey magazine

Our medical director at Princeton IVF and a Reproductive Endocrinologist at Delaware Valley OBGYN and Infertility, Lifeline Medical Associates, Dr. Seth Derman has been named one of Inside Jersey Magazine's Top 2219 Doctors for 2018.

The candidates for the top doctor list are vetted  by Castle Connolly, and nominated and selected by their peers for inclusion in this list.

Live birth after uterine transplant

Live birth after uterine transplant: Princeton IVF blog

Doctors at Baylor University deliver the first US baby born following uterine transplantation

A few years back, doctors in Sweden performed the first successful uterine transplant. Several academic fertility centers in the US have tried to replicate this here, and doctors at Baylor announced they were the first to do so.

Why would one want to transplant a uterus?

It is impossible to carry a baby without a uterus, also known as the womb. The early embryo implants itself into the wall the uterus about a week after conception and through the placenta and umbilical cord, its interface to the uterus, the fetus gets all of the nutrients and oxygen it needs to grow and even to survive.

Some women are born without a uterus (such as in the Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome), some have scar tissue in the uterus and others have had their uterus removed (a hysterectomy) for fibroids, cancer or some other reason. While there have been many many cases of ectopic pregnancies, where a pregnancy implants outside the uterus, these pregnancies nearly always need to be terminated early on since they can result on the death of the mother, and almost never results in a live birth of a baby. There is also interest in using a transplanted uterus in transgender women.

Are there alternatives ways to have baby without a uterus?

Currently, there is a very effective way of having a baby without a womb, and it is called Gestational Carrier IVF.  The eggs are harvested from the intended mother, sperm is collected from the intended father, and fertilization is performed in the IVF laboratory. The embryos are grown and transfered into the uterus another woman, referred to as a gestational carrier after her uterus is prepared for pregnancy using hormonal treatments. This can be costly (but much less so than a uterine transplatation), is illegal in some states and most importantly, the pregnancy is carried and delivered by someone else other than the intended mother.

How is a uterine transplant performed?

The uteri used for transplantation can be obtained from living donors or women who have recently passed away and offered their organs up for donation. Using an open incision (laparotomy in medical jingo), the donor uterus is attached the various blood vessels to ensure it has good supply and to attached to nearby structures to hold it in place. It is not attached to the fallopian tube.

How does a woman get pregnant after uterine transplantation?

IVF (in vitro fertilization) is required to achieve pregnancy since without a connection between the tube and uterus, pregnancy would otherwise be impossible. In years past, fertility surgeons, connected fallopian tubes to the uterus, but that operation has been abandoned since it rarely worked. IVF bypasses that problem and offers the best chance for pregnancy.

Are more uterine transplant babies coming?

The doctors at Baylor have another woman pregnant after uterine transplantation and IVF, a few more attempts planned. A number of women undergoing the procedure have not been successful. Other centers are trying this as well, but the costs are so high and it is not covered by insurance, so it not clear how widespread this will become.