semen analysis

ICSI is best for male infertility

Over 2 decades ago, ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection) revolutionized the treatment of male infertility. The ICSI procedure involves injection of a single sperm into each egg at the time of IVF (in vitro fertlization). Before the development of ICSI, couples with sperm issues, what we call "male factor," had very low fertilization and pregnancy rates, even when undergoing IVF. Now a days, because of the use of ICSI, poor sperm quality is a very unusual reason for an IVF cycle to be unsuccessful or to blame for poor fertilization. Over concerns about potentially poor fertilization, many fertility centers have chosen to use ICSI routinely to ensure optimal fertilization even when the male partner's sperm is perfectly normal. At Princeton IVF, our philosophy has always been to allow fertilization to happen "naturally" in the dish when there is no history of sperm issues or poor fertilization. While ICSI had been shown to be quite safe, we feel that a more natural selection process makes more sense and research in the past has suggested that ICSI is only beneficial in male factor patients. A recent large-scale study recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association has borne this out. ICSI  when used in IVF cycles used in couples without sperm issues had lower fertilization and lower implantation rates than non ICSI cycles.

Smoking and grandchildren- What's the connection?

Smoking while pregnantThere are plenty of reasons to quit smoking. The health effects of smoking are well known and well documented, not just on your fertility, but a whole number of health issues including heart disease and cancer. Now, there's yet another reason to quit smoking if you are pregnant  or trying to get pregnant. Cigarettes may actually affect a woman's male offspring's sperm quality. As reported in Human Reproduction, the male offspring of pregnant mice exposed to high levels of cigarette smoke had sperm with lower counts, lower motility and more abnormally shaped sperm (low morphology), and these male mice took longer longer to impregnate female mice who in turn gave birth to fewer mouse pups. So, what does this all mean? While we don't yet know if this is true in humans (or even 100 % sure it is true in animals), exposure to tobacco smoke could not only harm your fertility (among other things) but also could harm your unborn son's chances of fathering children. This is another good reason to quit.

Cell phones and male fertility

Sperm-motility-cell-phoneA recent study suggests that men who keeps their cellphones in their pants pockets, may have lower sperm motility. Researchers at the University of Exeter in the UK, found that men who kept cell phones in their pockets had lower sperm motility than those who did not, about an 8% reduction. Is this an issue? It remains to be seen whether this decrease really affects a couple's chances for pregnancy and truly causes infertility.  

Marijuana and abnormal sperm

Sperm-effects of marijuanaWith some states choosing to legalize marijuana, we hear very little of cannabis' effects on health, and even less on its impact on reproductive health. We have know for years that pot smoking can cause chromosomal breakage, and so for those couples trying to get pregnant, many reproductive specialists encourage both partners to quit when attempting pregnancy. Now, some new data out of the UK shows men who use marijuana are considerably more likely to have abnormally shaped sperm, Interestingly, in the same study, alcohol and tobacco did not.  Since even in normal men, it is normal to have some proportion of misshapen sperm, this finding in itself is not enough information to say that marijuana causes infertility. Still, why take the chance? This is just another good reason to quit if you are planning to start a family in the near future.

Appropriate and inappropriate use of fertility tests

ASRM logo from Princeton IVFChoosing Wisely, a project of the American Board of Internal Medicine foundation has published lists of procedures considered by most physicians in their fields to be either antiquated, useless or just simply a waste of resources. As part of this project the American Society for Reproductive Medicine has come up a list of their own as it relates to fertility testing and treatment :

  1. Routine laparoscopy for infertility, especially when the HSG is normal
  2. Advanced sperm testing such as the sperm penetration assay early in the workup
  3. Postcoital testing
  4. Testing for blood clotting disorders for infertility
  5. Immunological testing for infertility

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