conception

ICSI is best for male infertility

Over 2 decades ago, ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection) revolutionized the treatment of male infertility. The ICSI procedure involves injection of a single sperm into each egg at the time of IVF (in vitro fertlization). Before the development of ICSI, couples with sperm issues, what we call "male factor," had very low fertilization and pregnancy rates, even when undergoing IVF. Now a days, because of the use of ICSI, poor sperm quality is a very unusual reason for an IVF cycle to be unsuccessful or to blame for poor fertilization. Over concerns about potentially poor fertilization, many fertility centers have chosen to use ICSI routinely to ensure optimal fertilization even when the male partner's sperm is perfectly normal. At Princeton IVF, our philosophy has always been to allow fertilization to happen "naturally" in the dish when there is no history of sperm issues or poor fertilization. While ICSI had been shown to be quite safe, we feel that a more natural selection process makes more sense and research in the past has suggested that ICSI is only beneficial in male factor patients. A recent large-scale study recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association has borne this out. ICSI  when used in IVF cycles used in couples without sperm issues had lower fertilization and lower implantation rates than non ICSI cycles.

Stress and infertility- have we finally found a link?

stressMost fertility specialists, obgyns and midwives (and probably even your mother-in-law), know that stress can cause infertility. We see this in practice all the time, and numerous studies have shown that stress reduction techniques can help couples with infertility. Still, we do not quite understand the connection even though we know it exists. A recently published study from Ohio State looked at women trying to conceive and the levels of an enzyme called alpha amylase in their saliva. Alpha amylase is a considered a marker for stress, and the researchers found that women with higher levels had lower monthly pregnancy rates. Is this the missing link? Probably not, but it may be a first step in finding out how the mind affects fertility.

Asthma and infertility.....a link ?

ImageDanish researchers looked at large group twin sisters and found that when one of the twins had asthma, her time to conception (TTC) was longer than the sister who did not have asthma. However, this study published in the European Respiratory Journal, the sisters with asthma ultimately had just as many children as their healthier sisters. So, what does this mean? Does asthma harm your fertility? While this is certainly possible, it is just as likely that women with chronic diseases may just take a little longer to get pregnant.