baby

Should we be teaching about fertility in schools?

cervixOne Australian Fertility Specialist says yes, the classroom is the perfect place to learn about this, as reported on Yahoo News 7. Surveys continually show that the public, both women and men understand very little about their own fertility, and this is perpetuated in the media by stories of miracle late life pregnancies. Many women understand very little about how their own reproductive systems work, and even less about the true effect of age and lifestyle choices on their ability to have a family. Most of us reproductive specialists see patients all the time whose infertility could have been prevented. This doctor in Adelaide sees education as a sort of preventative medicine for infertility and  is advocating making fertility education a part of the school curriculum in his country, along side with  contraception. Will it work? And could it happen here in the US?

Genetics, epigenetics and IVF babies

ImageIt has been known for some time that couples suffering from infertility, including those who get pregnant using assisted reproductive techniques such as IVF, are more likely to have complicated pregnancies.: more high blood pressure, diabetes, miscarriages, preterm births and likely birth defects as well. This is true even with singleton pregnancies. What is not so clear is why this is so. Is it the patient population? Women who have infertility tend to be older and have more medical and metabolic problems. Is it the fertility medications such as clomid and injectables? Is it something in the process of IVF or IUI that causes problems? Researchers at Cedars Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles have received a large grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Development to help study the molecular events the underlie an early pregnancy after IVF. They will be looking at both genetics (the DNA in the chromosomes) and epigenetics (changes in gene expression that occur outside the chromosomes) to try to discover an explanation for these problems

5 million IVF Babies Born

ImageSince its start on the fringes of medicine, In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) has resulted in an estimated 5 million births worldwide as announced at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine and International Federation of Fertility Societies this week.  The biggest reason for the sudden explosion in IVF babies increased demand in developing countries such as China who now have access to modern medical care including fertility treatment.  There are now more children born through IVF than the population of some countries. That's pretty remarkable for something that 35 years ago was not readily accepted by society. Click here for more from the article in USA Today.