TTC

Couples with high cholesterol levels take longer to concieve

statinsA recent study from the NIH suggests that couples who have high cholesterol levels may not just be at higher risk for heart disease, they may also have a harder time getting pregnant. Couples (who were not yet considered infertile) in which both partners or even just the female partner had high cholesterol levels on average took a longer time to conceive. These findings are not so surprising since ovulation disorders such as polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) are among the most common causes for infertility, and many of these patients have underlying metabolic problems that place them at risk for heart disease and diabetes.  So what does this mean? It does not mean couples trying to get pregnant should rush out and go on statins to lower their cholesterol. Cholesterol is the chemical from which sex hormones such as estrogen and testosterone are made from, so these drugs could potentially be harmful to your fertility. However, healthy lifestyle changes such as moderate excercise and avoiding processed high carbohydrate foods may help both cholesterol and fertility.

Stress and infertility- have we finally found a link?

stressMost fertility specialists, obgyns and midwives (and probably even your mother-in-law), know that stress can cause infertility. We see this in practice all the time, and numerous studies have shown that stress reduction techniques can help couples with infertility. Still, we do not quite understand the connection even though we know it exists. A recently published study from Ohio State looked at women trying to conceive and the levels of an enzyme called alpha amylase in their saliva. Alpha amylase is a considered a marker for stress, and the researchers found that women with higher levels had lower monthly pregnancy rates. Is this the missing link? Probably not, but it may be a first step in finding out how the mind affects fertility.

Plastics and male infertility

nalgene-bpa free bottleThere has been a lot of chatter about effects of BPA in the news, an additive in plastics bottles and their effects on reproduction. The NIH decided to look into plastics additives effects on female and male fertility, and they found something interesting. Men who were exposed to pthalates, additives used to softer plastics such as vinyl took longer for their partners to conceive than those who did not; 20% longer. Surprisingly, BPA exposure in either partner and phthalate exposure in women did not affect fertility.  While this does not prove that these chemicals cause infertility in men, it is another piece in the unsolved puzzle about how that environment may be affecting our reproductive health.

Asthma and infertility.....a link ?

ImageDanish researchers looked at large group twin sisters and found that when one of the twins had asthma, her time to conception (TTC) was longer than the sister who did not have asthma. However, this study published in the European Respiratory Journal, the sisters with asthma ultimately had just as many children as their healthier sisters. So, what does this mean? Does asthma harm your fertility? While this is certainly possible, it is just as likely that women with chronic diseases may just take a little longer to get pregnant.